What would Brainiac v. 5.2 think if he had a guitar in his hand?

What would Brainiac v. 5.2 think if he had a guitar in his hand?

Regarding our opinion that rock is a completely different genre, when it is motivated by intelligence, as opposed to being built with a faux-macho attitude as its basis... The story goes that when Johnny Carson first watched Jay Leno's standup routine, he told Leno, "you don't have an act.  You have an attitude."  (Believe it or not, the very young Leno presented himself as an angry, disgusted consumer with a gruff rebuke for everybody within reach.)  Leno realized that Johnny was right, and gave up the shtick, and went about the task of becoming funny.  Carson then made Leno a star. We don't even realize it, but usually we're seeking attitude from celebrities -- a feel.  We feel like if they're tough, we're tough.  After all, we're wit dem. .............................. Cindy and I went to a Styx and Boston concert this last summer. After Styx' surprisingly strong, and unsurprisingly adolescent "show," Tommy Shaw graciously yelled out at the 40-something crowd, "We know that you want us to keep playing all night, but we want to see Boston. So thanks dudz! Catcha later! Party Hearty!" Well, not quite, but you know. Boston's road crew hustled out and began setting up. Eventually, a tall roadie -- wearing a roadie shirt! -- wandered out and started helping with setup, right in front of the fans. He tuned a guitar, practiced a few riffs from "Smoke on the Water," and we debated whether the tall roadie was Tom Scholz or not. Looked like him. Moved like him. Acted not like him. Acted like he was making minimum wage. The roadie who was tuning the Les Paul seemed to hesitate ... and then his bandmates strolled in, picked up their instruments, and everybody simply started playing the first Boston song. One of their newer tracks; the crowd didn't noticeably like the song. There was NO effort to incite the crowd -- to anything. And by the third song? The crowd was mesmerized, euphoric, and gloriously impassioned. It wasn't the band's attitude or mystique that we bought into. It was the band's music that captured us. When you know you're good, you don't have to sell anybody. Scholz doesn't bother. ................... Most of rock and roll isn't in on the joke. You've got an Axel Rose type standing up there, biceps measuring about 8 inches around :- ) gloating about how you're going to die, because you blundered onto his turf. Would Marilyn Manson (I know, I know, not rock) have any shot at all to survive a fistfight with Michelle Obama? Yet you're supposed to find this guy scary. You're supposed to find every lead singer slightly scary, even if he weighs less than his dope bag. Yet Rolling Stone will wax ecstatic over the passion and sincerity of any rock and roller, provided that their lyrics repeat (for the 50th year in a row) the lukewarm soup of 1960's counterculture. Hey, nobody can tell me not to have sex, Bobo! Am I a hero or what? ................ Ironically, the critics never cared for Boston, charging insincerity and lack of passion. Too mechanical, don'cha know. Sing about something important, something you believe in. Unless, of course, you don't care about the same things that 14-year-old boys believe in. Then, stifle yourself, Edith :- )

There has never been a more sincere lyricist than Tom Scholz. What does he care about? Chicks, nonviolence, and the environment. It's been the death of his sales. Early on, 1976-1978, Boston had The Mystique -- you can be cool if you hang with these guys, score chicks, go trippin', be Tha Thing. But Scholz quickly moved off of writing the for-14-year-olds shtick like this: I cant believe it when some people say That its a sin that way we live to die You know, theres never been a more natural thing Yea theres a brand new story, but its the same old lie Yea yea yea yea get down and party if you need a cue Youre sure to find one in the crowd Just meet some friends and have a toke or two In a place where they can never play the music too loud Get ready for a party tonight cause Im gettin right in the groove And if you've got somethin for me Ive got somethin for you And moved more towards the stuff he actually believed, the stuff like this: In my mind I can see reminders of a past decay So far behind Like the shadows linger at the close of day. And we could see We were timeless dreamers of another day. And we were free In a dawning age we had so much to say (sic - jemanji) Hollyann We made the dark into light. We saw the wrong and the right. We were for life And we would never concede it. We could live Just to turn the world into our fantasy. And we could give Aquarius was really meant to be. AQUARIUS?! LOL! There's a Google for you amigos who were born after 1969 or so :- ) Around 1984, the kids, and wannabe kids, figured out that Scholz wasn't really into juvenile stuff, wasn't really cool, and the game was up. So, they wandered off in search of fresh "Mystique-filled" rockers. Boston's fall from "Psychotically Great FM Rock" to "rock craftsmen, pleasant but unimportant" wasn't much based on the subtle lessening of the tension in their music. They lost their mystique when they lost the illusion that they were sex, drugs, and rock and roll (and when they lost Barry Goudreau's creative interaction with Tom Scholz). Boston grew up; the 40,000-strong crowds didn't... Boston believes in animal rights. Fighting against veal is noble; pretending that animals are as important as the 7-year-old girl who goes to school in the morning is not. I'm into decency, too, Tom; I'm not into a fantasy that the ecosystem shouldn't include carnivores. But the man says what he believes. That is supposed to be what rock and roll is about. Wouldn't it be nice if it was. :- ) Cheers, jemanji